Good Food

Informações:

Sinopsis

Evan Kleiman's taste of life, culture and the human species.

Episodios

  • Korean vegan, Golden Tortilla winner, huitlacoche, milk bread

    16/10/2021 Duración: 57min

    Attorney Joanne Lee Molinaro went vegan five years ago, modernizing the traditional Korean foods of her childhood and documenting the journey on TikTok as the Korean Vegan. She shares recipes and her family’s immigrant story in her new cookbook. Burritos La Palma is the winner of this year’s Great Tortilla Tournament of Champions, and owner Albert Bañuelos has been receiving congratulations from Jerez, where his father started the tortilleria over 40 years ago. At the farmer’s market, a Mexican delicacy known as huitlacoche is making a rare appearance. Kristina Cho uses her background in architecture to bake a perfectly versatile milk bread. There’s no looking back for pastry chef Hannah Ziskin who opened the doors of House of Gluten during the pandemic, and shares what’s next for “In the Weeds.” Finally, LA Times restaurant critic Bill Addison visits Agnes in Pasadena.

  • The Fuerte Four, boba, Thai in Hollywood, dates

    09/10/2021 Duración: 56min

    The gloves are off as Gustavo Arellano breaks down the Fuerte Four finalists in the flour and corn tortilla categories leading up to Sunday’s final judging at Smorgasburg for the Great Tortilla Tournament. Food and travel journalist shares her picks for top boba spots in the San Gabriel Valley. Luv 2 Eat chefs Noree Pla and Fern Kaewtathip brought their Thai cuisine from Phuket to Hollywood, and chronicle their journey in this week’s “In the Weeds.” Chef and restaurateur Peter Hoffman explains why restaurants and diners need to work together to improve the industry. It’s date season at the farmer’s market. Finally, LA Times restaurant critic travels to Little Ethiopia for a global pop-up.

  • Kitchen hacks, The Eso 8, superweeds, savory pancakes

    02/10/2021 Duración: 56min

    What’s the old adage — there’s no use crying over spilt milk? The same goes for burnt toast, according to Cal Peternell. He offers hacks and fixes for the most common kitchen flubs. Next, mother and daughter Maria and Cindy Vera share their battle with the city to keep their family business called La Gloria, which has been making flour tortillas since 1954. Gustavo Arellano returns to share the Eso 8 in the flour and corn brackets of the Great Tortilla Tournament of Champions. H. Claire Brown reports on herbicide’s losing battle against superweeds. LA Times restaurant critic Bill Addison bites into an array of savory pancakes in Koreatown. And quince is having its day at the farmer’s market.

  • Soaring food prices, Macedonian cuisine, Lebanese pop-up, and tortillas

    25/09/2021 Duración: 56min

    Eighteen months into the pandemic, the days of hoarding toilet paper are mercifully over. But that’s not to say there aren’t disruptions in the supply chain causing shortages on grocery store shelves, along with inflation. Laura Reiley reports on the business of food and why groceries are going to cost more through the end of the year. Gustavo Arellano is back with the annual Great Tortilla Tournament, which has been narrowed down to the Suave 16. Katerina Nitsou shares comfort food recipes from Macedonia that are perfect for the cooling forecast. LA Times restaurant critic Bill Addison discovers homestyle Lebanese recipes made from a kitchen in Hollywood. And market correspondent Gillian Ferguson tracks down guava and perilla at the Santa Monica Farmer’s Market that are ripe for this Indian Summer.

  • African American farmers, freedom dues and discrimination, dirty rice

    18/09/2021 Duración: 56min

    In her new book “We Are Each Other’s Harvest,” author Natalie Baszile brings together the narratives and histories of Black farmers in America. She co-hosts this edition of Good Food with Evan Kleiman, as they speak to those who are tied to the land and profiled in the book. “Farmers are living ancestors for Black people,” explains Baszile, whose personal history includes a connection to farming.  Clyde W. Ford provides a historical account of how the American government has failed Black farmers. Willie Earl Nelson and his son Adrain explain the discriminatory tactics deployed to deny Black farmers of capital to purchase land. O’Neal Bluefort remembers early days on his family’s tobacco farm and his grandfather’s final gift, and shares how he plans to continue his legacy. Baszile recounts a visit from her grandmother and her recipe for dirty rice. Finally, Naima Penniman, an activist behind Soul Fire Farm, reads her poem for future generations.

  • School lunch, breakfast burritos, Chez Panisse turns 50, inflammation

    11/09/2021 Duración: 56min

    Photographer Lucy Schaeffer captures the nostalgia and personal memories behind school lunch. Internal medicine doctor Rupa Marya and research professor Raj Patel discuss the disconnect between health and social justice in their book “Inflamed.” Iconic chef and restaurateur Alice Waters celebrates the 50th anniversary of the groundbreaking Berkeley institution, Chez Panisse. LA Times restaurant critic Bill Addison runs down the best breakfast burritos in the city. Finally, cue the sweet peppers at the farmer’s market.

  • Rice: How we grow, cook, and eat it

    04/09/2021 Duración: 56min

    Whether cooking basmati, jasmine or red, everyone has a way to make rice. Measure up to the first knuckle? Wash until the water runs clear? Stovetop or rice cooker with bells and whistles? This week, Good Food gets granular with rice — how it's grown, how it's cooked, and how it's eaten. Dr. Amber Spry opens her identity politics class each semester by asking students to share how their family cooked rice. Culinarian historian Michael Twitty shares how red rice came to the American South by way of Western Africa. Rice royalty Robin Koda documents her family’s legacy of growing Japanese rice in California. Matt Goulding explores the controversy over paella in Spain. The history of the rice cooker is explained by Anne Ewbank. Finally, Sophia Parsa is making tahdigs with her mother for this week’s edition of “In the Weeds.”

  • Nicholas Cage’s “Pig,” mythical food, snacks, beer

    28/08/2021 Duración: 56min

    Books and movies have acted as a balm during the pandemic. Food writing provides a sort of fantastical consumption that requires using your imagination and wonder. In a new film starring Nicholas Cage, creators Michael Sarnoski and Vanessa Block worked with Portland chefs in creating the lead role of a truffle hunter in the Oregon wilderness. Science fiction writer Eli Lee taps into personal food memories and the familiar to create imaginary meals in her latest work. From “The Hobbit” to “Star Wars,” Leslie Bilderback recreates dishes described in favorite childhood stories and films in her new cookbook. Stuck on the couch, Folu Akinkuotu started a newsletter during the pandemic that combined her love of snacks and itch to travel. For this week’s “In the Weeds,” Beny Ashburn and Teo Hunter talk about what's on tap at Crowns & Hops, a Black-owned brewery in Inglewood. Finally, it’s apple season at the farmer’s market.

  • Anosmia, sweat, sushi, mangoes

    21/08/2021 Duración: 56min

    Why would coffee smell like gasoline and fried chicken like garbage? People are experiencing troubling sensory side effects from COVID. Dr. Nancy Rawson of the  Monell Institute of Smell in Philadelphia explains the difference between anosmia and parosmia. Journalist Sarah Everts gets up close and personal to discover the curious science of sweat. LA Times restaurant critic reviews Morihiro in Atwater Village. “In the Weeds” follows the mother-daughter duo behind Sazòn in Huntington Park. Finally, it’s the final days of mangoes at the farmer’s market.

  • Park’s BBQ, eating for the climate, foraging, tomatoes

    14/08/2021 Duración: 56min

    Chef Jenee Kim of Park’s BBQ recalls opening the restaurant nearly two decades ago and how she persevered during the pandemic for a new edition of “In the Weeds.” Paul Greenberg has tips on lowering carbon emissions by consuming consciously. Chef Alan Bergo forages the familiar and exotic with new ways of looking at a sunflower and milkweed. Tomatoes are all the rage at the farmer’s market. Beth Dooley shares how a newly developed grain is regenerating the land in the Upper Midwest. Finally, Bill Addison reviews the Brentwood location of Suzanne Goin and Caroline Styne’s second outpost of A.O.C..

  • Home economics, nonstick pans, Middle Eastern dishes, and fish butchery

    07/08/2021 Duración: 56min

    Chefs Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis pay homage to their Middle Eastern heritage in their sophomore restaurant cookbook, “Bavel.” In a year of hours clocked in the kitchen and embracing DIY projects, journalist Danielle Dreilinger traces the history of the surprising science behind the field of home economics. TASTE editor Anna Hezel weighs in on the benefits of nonstick cookware. Australian chef Josh Niland approaches fish butchery with sustainability and suggestions on how to use every component of a fish. Market correspondent Gillan Ferguson talks about melons with farmer Alex Weiser and Chef Sarah Hymanson of Kismet. Los Angeles Times restaurant critic Bill Addison heads south to Anaheim for Yemeni cuisine. 

  • Colombian cuisine, Gullah Geechee food, difficult fruit

    31/07/2021 Duración: 56min

    Colombia, with its Carribean and Pacific coasts and Andres mountain ridges, has vast climates and Indigenous communities that influence its regional cuisines and flavors. This week, food stylist Mariana Velàsquez speaks about the essential, fresh ingredients of her homeland’s recipes and pays homage to the women who were the backbone of her childhood in the kitchen. Gullah Geechee farmer and chef Matt Raiford describes the seafood of the Georgia coast, including shrimp for breakfast. From parmesan versus Parmigiano Reggiano to crispy versus crunchy, Brette Warshaw answers “What’s the difference?” between some of the kitchen and grocery aisles most common headscratchers. Piemaker Kate Lebo embraces fruit and waxes poetic about its more difficult varieties. Eggplant makes its appearance at the farmer’s market. Finally, Bill Addison visits a Cameroonian restaurant in Boyle Heights.

  • Mother Nature, California drought, water rights

    24/07/2021 Duración: 56min

    This week, author and journalist Mark Arax chronicles the journey water takes in California, from the mountainous peaks and snow melts of the north, through the nut and fruit farms of the Central Valley, and up and over the mountain to the faucets and swimming pools of Southern California. Environmental attorney Thomas Linzey discusses his work defending the “rights of nature.” Science writer Lucy Jones makes the connection between nature and mental health. At the Santa Monica Farmer’s Market, Dawn Birch reveals unprecedented steps she and her husband are taking to irrigate their property, and Chef Carlos Salgado is in search of peaches. 

  • Barbacoa, wine, wanderlust, Bourdain

    17/07/2021 Duración: 56min

    This week, Bill Esparza continues his trek through California in search of the best barbacoa. Matt Kettmann makes recommendations for tasting room visits in Santa Barbara wine country. Chef Renee Erickson has recipes inspired by her travel, making a getaway as close as the kitchen. Food stylist and chef Sarah Glover offers kid-friendly camping cooking tips that spark imagination for overnighters in the wild. If you’re looking to escape the heat at a movie theater, Morgan Neville’s new film “Roadrunner” reveals the joys and pain of the most recognized traveler of our time — Anthony Bourdain. Plus, a quick trip to the farmer’s market for summer corn.

  • Plastics, barbacoa, Wolfgang Puck

    10/07/2021 Duración: 56min

    Evan Kleiman visits “The Plastic Bag Store,” where artist Robin Frohardt has designed products from collected materials that speak to the foreverness of single-use plastics and what it means for the future. Bill Esparza journeys through Los Angeles for barbacoa, the pit-roasted meat found across Mexico. The availability window for Blenheim apricots is open, and Sherry Yard shares how she is using those from See Canyon Fruit Ranch. Director David Gelb reveals the rise of the celebrity chef in his new documentary “Wolfgang.” Journalist and editor Laurie Ochoa remembers Chef Mark Peel. Finally, Los Angeles Times restaurant critic Bill Addison returns with his weekly reviews.

  • Smorgasburg returns, cold noodles, Micheladas, ice cream

    03/07/2021 Duración: 56min

    The heat is on, so Good Food celebrates all things cold but starts with the reopening of Smogasburg on July 4. General Manager Zach Brooks has a rundown of new vendors and old favorites. Eater LA Associate Editor Cathy Chaplin shares where to get cold bowls of noodles to stay cool. Dr. Rajita Katta reveals the curious phenomenon of Margarita dermatitis, a skin condition caused by citrus juice on the skin and exposure to the sun. Richard Parks III speaks to Fernando Lopez of I Love Micheladas about the southland’s favorite beer cocktail. Dave Arnold has perfected the gin and tonic. Finally, the history of the men and women who drive ice cream trucks.

  • ‘We Are Each Other’s Harvest’: African American farmers, land, and legacy

    26/06/2021 Duración: 56min

    In her new book “We Are Each Other’s Harvest,” author Natalie Baszile brings together the narratives and histories of Black farmers in America. She co-hosts this edition of Good Food with Evan Kleiman, as they speak to those who are tied to the land and profiled in the book. “Farmers are living ancestors for Black people,” explains Baszile, whose personal history includes a connection to farming.  Clyde W. Ford provides a historical account of how the American government has failed Black farmers. Willie Earl Nelson and his son Adrain explain the discriminatory tactics deployed to deny Black farmers of capital to purchase land. O’Neal Bluefort remembers early days on his family’s tobacco farm and his grandfather’s final gift with wishes to continue his legacy. Baszile recounts a visit from her grandmother and her recipe for dirty rice. Finally, Naima Penniman reads her poem for future generations.

  • Juneteenth, ‘High on the Hog,’ restaurants return

    19/06/2021 Duración: 56min

    June 19, 1865 was the day in Galveston, Texas when enslaved African Americans learned they were free a full two years after then-President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. Today is Juneteenth, the yearly holiday Black Americans celebrate their true emancipation. Chef and artist Ray Anthony Barrett discusses how he incorporates Hoppin’ John and other dishes into his Juneteenth menus. Host Stephen Satterfield joins producers Fabienne Toback and Karis Jagger in their journey to bring the book “High on the Hog” by Jessica B. Harris to the small screen. Los Angeles Times restaurant critic Bill Addison returns with his most anticipated dining experiences now that reservations are open across the city. Stephanie Wilson solicited funds to reopen the beloved diner Swingers in this week’s edition of “In the Weeds.” Marcia Chatelain recently was awarded a Pulitzer in history for her work, “Franchise.” Finally, it’s berry season at the farmer’s market.

  • Hospitality, chocolate, root beer, cider

    12/06/2021 Duración: 56min

    With California fully reopening on June 15, many restaurants are poised to drop capacity limits and masks. Good Food looks at the idea of hospitality, starting with longtime server Tiffany Coty at Lawry’s. Essayist and activist Priya Basil describes the roots of the word “hospitality” and the notion of give and take in and outside of the industry. Journalist Simran Sethi details two cases that the U.S. Supreme Court will decide on, which hold “Big Chocolate” accountable for child labor abuses in the cocoa supply chain. Peter Bahlawanian has a primer for making root beer at home. Dan Pucci and Craig Cavallo share the history of cider. Finally, cherries come to the Santa Monica Farmer’s Market.

  • Barbecue, whole hog, beef, butchery

    05/06/2021 Duración: 56min

    Barbecue season is upon us. Good Food heads to the pit for the smoke, the meat, and the masters. Adrian Miller examines the surprising and often overlooked beginnings of American barbecue. Rodney Scott was cooking a whole hog every weekend by the time he was 17-years-old and shares his knowledge of mastering the pit. Andrew and Michelle Munoz are the husband-wife team behind Texas-style Moo’s Craft Barbecue. They explain their backyard to brick & mortar journey in this week’s edition of “In the Weeds.” Nicolette Hahn Niman examines the complex relationship between raising beef and the environment. Gabriela Gomez fell in love with butchering in high school and is now behind the block at Electric City Butcher. Finally, new potatoes are plentiful at the farmer’s market.

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