Sinopsis

Donald Trumps historic presidency is unlike any other thats come before it. From his outsider status in Washington to his familys continued residence in New York to his complicated business empire, each episode of this podcast will focus on one aspect of Trumps time in the White House that defies conventions and ask the question, Can he do that? Hosted by Allison Michaels and co-hosted each week by a different Post reporter, Can He Do That? features original reporting that will illuminate the ways Donald Trump can reshape the presidency and explain what that means for people in the United States and the rest of the world.

Episodios

  • How Trump is leveraging the presidency to campaign against Biden

    How Trump is leveraging the presidency to campaign against Biden

    21/05/2020 Duración: 28min

    This presidential campaign season is unlike any other in history. I know, that sounds like something people in world of politics say a lot. But this time, in 2020, during a global pandemic, the campaign trail looks dramatically different — and for now, mostly empty.Former vice president Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, has spent the past few months holding virtual events, largely from his basement. President Trump, meanwhile, has resumed some travel, though in an official capacity as president and not as part of the campaign.That distinction though, has been muddled as Trump’s travel schedule shows trips to the battleground states that are crucial to his reelection chances. And what’s more, these events have taken on clear campaign overtones: Supporters have lined the streets to greet his motorcade, and Trump’s campaign soundtrack even played inside a facility while he toured.Is Trump leveraging unfair advantages with an election just six months away? What powers does he have to ensure he can sa

  • Politics, pressure and pleas: The twisting case of Michael Flynn and the Justice Department

    Politics, pressure and pleas: The twisting case of Michael Flynn and the Justice Department

    14/05/2020 Duración: 33min

    Michael Flynn's legal battle brings the Justice Department into uncharted territory, with boundaries between the department and the president newly tested. National security reporter Devlin Barrett unpacks the latest in this ongoing story.

  • The president’s desperate push to reopen America

    The president’s desperate push to reopen America

    07/05/2020 Duración: 30min

    White House Bureau Chief Philip Rucker offers an inside look at President Trump's late-March decision to extend social distancing guidelines, and his soon-after pivot to strongly push for a quick economic revival and reopening of the United States.

  • The Postal Service is in dire need. Trump wants to block the loan that could save them.

    The Postal Service is in dire need. Trump wants to block the loan that could save them.

    30/04/2020 Duración: 35min

    Will the Postal Service survive? Reporter Jacob Bogage details Trump’s desire to withhold a loan from the agency, and elections administration expert Amber McReynolds discusses the challenges of an election likely to rely more than ever on vote by mail.

  • The U.S. is spending trillions to save the economy. Where does all that money come from?

    The U.S. is spending trillions to save the economy. Where does all that money come from?

    23/04/2020 Duración: 29min

    Trillions of dollars have been injected into the U.S. economy since March. Late last month, Congress passed a $2 trillion relief bill, the Cares Act, designed to help the country cope with the economic devastation it has faced since the novel coronavirus outbreak began.But those trillions weren’t enough.New legislation expected to pass in Congress on Thursday adds $484 billion to that total. These funds are allocated for small-business recovery, hospitals and coronavirus testing.As our country faces incredibly trying circumstances, emergency money from the federal government is intended to help us recover, to help businesses weather the storm and to keep our economy stable. So, is it working?As the federal government injects more and more money, where does it all come from? What are the short-term and long-term consequences of these economic decisions? And as we head toward the election in November, how does this all effect President Trump’s economic message — once a key pillar of his reelection efforts?On th

  • Freezing funding, adjourning Congress, reopening states. What are the limits on Trump’s power?

    Freezing funding, adjourning Congress, reopening states. What are the limits on Trump’s power?

    16/04/2020 Duración: 30min

    Each week, our country’s response to the novel coronavirus pandemic presents new questions. Some of those questions are about the role of the president in a crisis, or the role of governors and local leaders, or the role of international organizations, or even the role of Congress. This particular week raised questions about all of those things.President Trump early in the week said that he has“total authority” to order the reopening of state’s economies. Though, on a call with governors Thursday, Trump told them,“You’re going to call your own shots” and later released new guidance that didn’t lay out a specific timeline for relaxing social distancing restrictions.Also this week, the administration announced plans to freeze funding to the World Health Organization pending an investigation into their handling of the coronavirus crisis.Finally, at a news conference midweek, Trump threatened to force Congress to adjourn so he could fill some vacant positions in his administration without Senate approval.Together

  • A president’s push for an unproven cure

    A president’s push for an unproven cure

    09/04/2020 Duración: 32min

    As the country continues to battle the spread of the novel coronavirus, many are desperately in search of answers, solutions and treatment options.In search himself, for something of a cure, President Trump has repeatedly touted one particular drug as the likely savior for covid-19 patients: hydroxychloroquine.At this point, hydroxychloroquine is an unproven treatment for covid-19. It’s still in the testing stages as a treatment for the virus, it can have dangerous side effects for some, and medical professionals are divided on its likelihood of success.Yet none of those factors have stopped the president from advocating that people infected with the novel coronavirus consider taking this drug, in consultation with their doctors.Many doctors and scientists advising Trump have advocated that he exercise more caution in talking about the drug’s potential promise. But others inside the White House — and on Fox News — have been influencing Trump, offering him anecdotal evidence of the drug’s success.Meanwhile, cl

  • States are competing for life-saving medical equipment. Who decides where it goes?

    States are competing for life-saving medical equipment. Who decides where it goes?

    02/04/2020 Duración: 33min

    As the spread of the novel coronavirus grows in the United States, many states finds themselves in need of medical equipment like ventilators and protective equipment for health care workers.Yet, for most states getting said equipment has not been easy. Requests have begun to outweigh supply and many states complain there’s a lack of guidance about how they can secure life-saving supplies.Governors are making increasingly frantic requests to the Federal Emergency Management Agency for materials. State and congressional leaders are flooding FEMA with calls seeking clarity about how resources will be allocated. Several calls have been made straight to the president himself, and some governors seem to have better luck in those calls than others. While states like Oklahoma and Kentucky have received more of some equipment than they requested, others like Illinois, Massachusetts and Maine have secured only a fraction of their requests.This disparity has led many state officials to raise the question of whethe

  • Rugged individualism vs. social distancing enforcement: Who can keep us home and how?

    Rugged individualism vs. social distancing enforcement: Who can keep us home and how?

    26/03/2020 Duración: 32min

    Much of life as we know it in the United States has drastically changed over recent weeks. Local and state authorities have closed many businesses and mandated that residents stay at home or limit the size of gatherings.Yet how these restrictions are implemented across the country varies widely. Furthermore, even in areas where restrictions can carry legal penalties, enforcement is rare.The United States is, of course, set up this way: States have the power to work independently, in coordination with the federal government. But it means our country’s response to the novel coronavirus pandemic is much more patchyc and localized than in other countries responding around the world.The variations across state and local guidance have caused quite a bit of confusion about what exactly is allowed during this time — and where. It has also raised questions about the federal government’s role in instituting social-distancing measures nationwide.How likely are we to see greater enforcement against breaking social-distan

  • U.S. elections are being tested like never before. What comes next?

    U.S. elections are being tested like never before. What comes next?

    19/03/2020 Duración: 31min

    The novel coronavirus pandemic has presented some serious challenges to the American electoral process.To solve these new public health challenges, some states have delayed primary voting. Other states have implemented social-distancing measures at polling locations, with mixed results. Others yet have geared up to increase mail-in ballot capacity.Each of these circumstances raise different issues for how voters can choose a candidate in this year’s primary election.Some Democratic primaries, for example, are now scheduled for after the deadline previously set for choosing a Democratic candidate — and only weeks before the Democratic National Convention.Plus, all of these now-complicated primaries lead up to a nationwide voting day in November. Could these primary delays somehow delay America’s choice for the next president? More specifically, can the president himself delay, cancel or change the circumstances of November’s election?And as our electoral process is tested by all of these new voting measures, w

  • The U.S. stumbled at the start of the coronavirus outbreak. Can we make up for lost time?

    The U.S. stumbled at the start of the coronavirus outbreak. Can we make up for lost time?

    12/03/2020 Duración: 20min

    The World Health Organization has declared the novel coronavirus outbreak a global pandemic. The virus has spread in the United States, with new cases reported daily, deaths totaling more than three dozen, and an expanding list of large-scale cancellations, including the NBA, the NCAA tournaments and Broadway shows.In response, the Trump administration has taken various steps to limit the spread of the virus and to help a suffering economy.But those steps haven’t always gone so well. The administration was initially slow to take the virus seriously: The U.S. had an inadequate number of tests available; at times, messages out of the White House conflicted with experts and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and there’s been a lack of centralized guidance around social distancing and other potential public health measures that could help contain the virus.In light of some of these issues, President Trump addressed the nation from the Oval Office on Wednesday night. The president signaled the serious

  • Does the president have much power to control a viral outbreak?

    Does the president have much power to control a viral outbreak?

    05/03/2020 Duración: 26min

    Since it was first detected on the last day of 2019, coronavirus has infected tens of thousands of people around the world and has killed more than 3,000. The outbreak has triggered unprecedented quarantines, stock market upheaval and dangerous conspiracy theories.Most cases are mild, but health officials say the virus’s continued spread through the United States is inevitable. As the country and our health-care system prepares, a lot is still unknown.President Trump has repeatedly sought to reassure the nation about coronavirus and organized a communications effort to downplay risk. He has appointed Vice President Pence to run a task force and tried to boost an economy faltering in response to fears.He has also suggested closing the Southern border, falsely said a vaccine could be available very soon, falsely suggested the virus could be gone by April and disagreed with the World Health Organization’s mortality rate of 3.4 percent globally.Trump’s overall response to this public health crisis presents a seri

  • The delegate math questions you were too embarrassed to ask

    The delegate math questions you were too embarrassed to ask

    02/03/2020 Duración: 24min

    The Republican Party’s 2020 primary season has been pretty straightforward. President Trump has no serious competition for the Republican nomination. But for the Democrats, it’s far less clear who will become their party’s nominee for president of the United States.With so many candidates competing to define the future of the Democratic Party and running on a range of ideologies, it’s been a heated presidential primary season.Candidates have tried to boost their potential and their profile by winning early voting states. But those states offer a very small portion of the total delegates needed to secure the nomination.Things change a bit on Super Tuesday, which falls on March 3. On Super Tuesday, the most states at a time hold nominating contests, the most voters have a chance to go to the polls, and the most delegates will be allotted to candidates. More than a third of all delegates for the Democratic National Convention are up for grabs on this day alone.Despite recent dropouts from Pete Buttigieg and Tom

  • Hacks, chaos and doubt: Lessons from the 2016 election revisited

    Hacks, chaos and doubt: Lessons from the 2016 election revisited

    28/02/2020 Duración: 28min

    In 2016, as the Democratic Party officially selected its nominee, then-candidate Donald Trump saw an opportunity to deepen the schisms that had emerged among Democrats.Four years later, President Trump seems to be embracing a similar opportunity.In tweets, at rallies and in interactions with the press, Trump has suggested that this year’s Democratic primary is rigged against Bernie Sanders.Trump’s assertions about a flawed Democratic primary are just a piece of the story. He’s stoking divisions based in part on information Russia weaponized to highlight those divisions in the first place. And as we confront another election year, recent reports show Russia hopes to interfere again.So, how is Trump strategizing for 2020 in light of recent news? And how are things different this time around, when a president with sizable power over intelligence and election security is seeking to win reelection himself?In this episode of the “Can He Do That?” podcast, Washington Post campaign reporter Sean Sullivan and Laura Ro

  • The problems with pardon power

    The problems with pardon power

    20/02/2020 Duración: 28min

    Only a few presidential powers are very clearly outlined in the U.S. Constitution. One of those is the president’s power to pardon.We’ve seen President Trump exercise his pardon power at several moments during his tenure in office - sometimes to much controversy.Tuesday, the president continued this trend. He pardoned or commuted the sentences of several convicted white-collar criminals at the center of federal anti-corruption and tax fraud cases.Trump’s choice to grant clemency to this group, combined with a reported desire from the administration to issue more pardons in the coming months, raises questions about who else Trump might pardon. Among them is his longtime adviser and friend Roger Stone, who was sentenced Thursday to serve three years four months for impeding a congressional investigation of 2016 Russian election interference.Trump left this door open when he said at an event in Las Vegas Thursday that while he wasn’t going to grant clemency to Stone right now, Stone “has a very good chance of ex

  • Trump’s view of a unilaterally powerful president goes unchallenged

    Trump’s view of a unilaterally powerful president goes unchallenged

    13/02/2020 Duración: 25min

    Since President Trump was acquitted by the Senate in his impeachment trial, there has been a lot of action out of the White House. From firing people in his administration who testified against him in the House Inquiry to compromising the Justice Department’s independence, Trump's actions seem to paint a picture of a president who feels emboldened by the resolution of his months-long impeachment battle. So does this post-acquittal moment reflect a president more emboldened than before? White House reporter Ashley Parker offers insight into President Trump’s perception of power and what we can expect to see from him in an election year.Related episodesA president acquitted. The balance of power tested. If a president is impeached, can they run for reelection?'The Framers would not recognize the modern presidency.’

  • A president acquitted. The balance of power tested.

    A president acquitted. The balance of power tested.

    05/02/2020 Duración: 22min

    The United States Senate acquitted President Trump on charges — brought by the House of Representatives — of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.The vote fell largely along party lines, with one exceptions. Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah historically voted with the Democrats to convict the president on the first article: abuse of power. That marked the first time in American history that a member of the president’s own party has voted to remove him. Romney voted with Republicans to acquit Trump on the second article: obstruction of congress.This moment is only the third time in U.S. history that the Senate has held an impeachment trial. The Senate has never voted to convict and remove a president.An impeachment trial in the Senate means Congress is deciding where to draw lines around presidential conduct: What’s acceptable, what’s inappropriate and what rises to the level of “high crimes and misdemeanors?”Over the course of the Senate trial, House managers and Trump’s lawyers engaged in arguments for their r

  • Will the Iowa caucuses clarify anything? Lessons from history in an unpredictable year

    Will the Iowa caucuses clarify anything? Lessons from history in an unpredictable year

    30/01/2020 Duración: 32min

    The 2020 Iowa caucuses present unprecedented challenges for some top Democratic contenders. Several candidates polling highest in Iowa have been unable to physically spend much time in the state in the final weeks before the vote. Senators Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Amy Klobuchar and Michael Bennet have been back in Washington serving as jurors in the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump.Having a presence in those final weeks in Iowa can be the key to wooing any remaining undecided voters. And this year, there are quite a few.What’s more, at least one candidate won’t even appear on the ballot in Iowa. Businessman Michael Bloomberg is opting out of the first four primaries and caucuses, making his entry on Super Tuesday ballots.So, given these new complicating factors, does Iowa matter in a different way than in past elections? How important is this state to the final outcome of the primary? How might the Senators’ scaled-down presence in Iowa the final weeks before the caucus

  • How Bolton’s allegation — no, not the one you’re thinking of — could change the impeachment trial

    How Bolton’s allegation — no, not the one you’re thinking of — could change the impeachment trial

    28/01/2020 Duración: 21min

    Details of former national security advisor John Bolton’s unpublished book manuscript became public Sunday.These details suggested that Bolton could provide firsthand evidence that President Trump directly tried to deny security assistance to Ukraine until they announced investigations into political opponents, including Joe and Hunter Biden. That assertion from Bolton’s book has renewed the call by Democrats for witnesses in Trump’s Senate impeachment trial.And yet, that interaction between Trump and Bolton, though potentially the most explosive, wasn’t the only conversation alleged in the leaked details of Bolton’s book. Another, was a key interaction between Bolton and Attorney General William Barr shortly after Trump’s now infamous call with Ukraine president Volodymyr Zelensky.On this episode Matt Zapotosky, The Post’s Justice Department reporter, focuses on that Bolton-Barr conversation: What the purported exchange between Bolton and Barr might tells us about the Attorney General’s role in Ukraine-relat

  • How Trump’s impeachment lawyers could undermine him in court

    How Trump’s impeachment lawyers could undermine him in court

    23/01/2020 Duración: 16min

    Trump is fighting impeachment-related battles in both the Senate and the court system. His lawyers have conflicting strategies in each arena. The Post’s Ann Marimow explains why these cases matter for the future of presidential power.

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